JWP-9839

City Talk on the making of a smart Sydney

The challenge of inspiring and nurturing innovation in Sydney will be tackled by an exceptional panel featuring Chris Anderson, head of the influential TED talks, at the Smart Sydney City Talks on May 28.

Creative and technological breakthroughs don’t happen without technical skill and great ideas, but they also need good social networks, a creative environment and financial support.

How do we create an environment for innovation in Sydney – and how do we nurture those start up projects and businesses, to create the mid-sized and larger businesses of the future? That’s the question our expert panel will discuss on Monday night.

Panel members include Nick Leeder (Managing Director, Google Australia and New Zealand), Hael Kobayashi (Executive Director, Creative Innovation, University of Technology Sydney), Ann Mossop (Head of Public Programs, Sydney Opera House and co-curator, Festival of Dangerous Ideas), Mark Scott OA (Managing Director, Australian Broadcasting Corporation) and David Vandenberg (Director, Fishburners).

We’ll discuss how the government, business, education and media sectors can work together to create a Sydney that not only fosters innovation and inspiration – but also showcases it to the world.

I encourage you to join us on Monday night to discuss these issue at the State Theatre, 49 Market Street from 6pm. Tickets are free but booking is essential on 1300 139 588.

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@clovermoore
Two weeks after getting it wrong, the Daily Tele 'clarifies' their errors. But today's effort gets it wrong too. Despite claims in this 'clarification', the Tele always knew @cityofsydney was not involved in this project because we and CoDesign Studio told them so from the beginning. They won't let the facts get in the way of their agenda.

@clovermoore
This is Mary Veronica, the new tunneling machine which will help flood-proof Green Square. Anyone living in or passing through the Green Square area during April's torrential rains would remember chest-high water and flooding. Work has commenced on a new 2.4km underground stormwater drain to reduce the damage of such floods and help make this area a great place for thousands of people to live and work safely. At a cost of more than $90 million, this project is a key component of the City’s $440 million transformation plan for new infrastructure and community facilities.